Girl eating peanut butter

Food allergies and intolerance – Peanut allergy

Trying not to go nutty? Peanut allergy

Around 3% of children show positive results for peanut allergy test (interestingly, only one in three though will show a reaction after eating peanuts). Keep in mind that the rate of peanut reaction differs from one country to another; Australia has a relatively high rate of peanut allergy for reasons unknown.

In most cases, reactions to peanuts are relatively mild – for example hives, tummy upsets, nausea and sometimes vomiting. However, as we have all seen recently in the media, reactions can be severe leading to difficulty breathing, collapse, loss of consciousness, and if untreated, death.

Here’s a brief list of foods to be mindful of and to avoid due to potential risky ingredients:

  • Peanuts, ground nuts, beer nuts, monkey nuts
  • Peanut oil – cold-pressed, expressed, or expelled (note: Arachis oil is peanut oil). Highly refined peanut oil is unlikely to cause a reaction in those with a peanut allergy.
  • All peanut products e.g. peanut butter
  • Crushed / ground peanut – in sauces or coating on food (cakes, buns, ice-cream), satay sauce, peanut sauce
  • Products containing traces of peanut (this is far and wide)

About 80% of children under five with a peanut allergy will continue to experience symptoms into later childhood (those with severe reactions are the ones who are less likely to overcome it) and unfortunately some 20% of children’s peanut allergy will worsen. Some lucky 20% grow out of their allergy.

Read more here

Cadence health

This information has been provided by Leanne Cooper Director of Cadence Health and Food Coaching Courses, Leanne is a registered nutritionist and mother of two very active boys.

This fact sheet may be reproduced in whole or in part for education and non-profit purposes with acknowledgement of the source. It may not be reproduced for commercial use or sale.
The information presented is not intended to replace medical advice.

Updated July 2014.